Spring bloomers in the neighborhood (both large and small)

After a week of dreary rain, Melissa and Lindsey come out for lunch the other day and we took a walk around the neighborhood to look for signs of spring. The crocus planted in our co-op garden last fall have have come up beautifully. I particularly love the bi-colored 'King of the Striped'. But I have a question nagging at me. Is it a mistake to buy the crocus color mixtures? I kind of think it is and next year might rather order by variety so I can plant in clumps of one type. These are the kind of big life-changing thoughts that sometimes bug gardeners...

PS the iphone photos give this kind of greeting card halo to the images in case you're wondering

One of the nice things about Jackson Heights is the maturity of many of the shrub and tree plantings around the co-op apartments. We saw this huge andromeda (Pieris japonica) in full bloom next to a sculptural small-leaved azalea at The Towers. This impressive andromeda is about 8 feet tall and since they are very slow growing, you know it has to be quite old. The dangling white flowers are about 4-inches long and remind me of old costume jewelry.

This star magnolia on the corner was the first tree to bloom. Hello, nice to see you.

Can anyone identify this ferny-leaved plant? The flowers are yellow. There was another one growing in the crevice of a wall kind of like a corydalis... Any ideas?

9 comments:

Elizabeth said...

gorgeous! I always look forward to your posts.

Stephen Orr said...

Thank you Elizabeth. I need to be a better (or at least more frequent) poster! ;)

Kaveh said...

I usually planted them in huge clumps of one variety. The great thing about Crocus is they are relatively inexpensive and you can buy them in batches of 500 or 1000.

But that picture of the mixed ones is pretty. I don't think you can really go wrong with crocus.

Anonymous said...

Corydalis cheilanthifolia is the plant in the last photo. -Paul

Barry Parker said...

Hi Stephen,
I was about to identify the plant in the last photo as Corydalis cheilanthifolia, but see that Paul has already done so, the question now is what is Cheilanthes?
By the way, I'm on the side of mass planting of crocus on single species and varieties.

k1063g said...

Cheilanthes is a genus of ferns. So Corydalis cheilanthifolia is a fern-leaved corydalis and when not in flower many people mistake it for a fern. It is a wonderful self-sower and loves growing in the crevices of rock wall.

Stephen Orr said...

Thank you both for the information about the corydalis. I thought it looked like one but couldn't find a reference for it in my books. I may have to go take a few seeds

Les said...

I am glad I stopped by, because I have been trying to ID a Corydalis in my garden too, but I think this is different. The foliage is not quite right.

Stephen Orr said...

Hi Les,
I wonder if you have Corydalis lutea it has a leaf more like a bleeding heart. It's the corydalis I'm more familiar with.